A self-reflection: farewell to student newspapers, again

We were going for a John Hughes style and I think we pulled it off. Finally, I'm not Ducky.

So I’ve finished my tenure with the Cardozo Jurist. I did not join my 1L year because I naively thought that I would instead concentrate on classes and get good grades and get on a law journal or externship or something instead of just write for what I viewed at the time as a rather mediocre student newspaper. As I said many times, working for a student newspaper in law school makes as much sense as working for a law journal in undergrad. But as my failures became more obvious, I decided to play towards my strengths and join the Jurist. Two years later, I regret not joining earlier.

I’m used to being outspoken in print, but the irrational fear of expressing opinion that infests law students makes my normal style seem even more outrageous. However, this was tempered by the fact that the Jurist only came out once a month, and lots of law students simply didn’t care about a student newspaper.

I would like to think that I had a positive influence on the paper, showing that there was a space for student voices, leading a much-needed redesign, encouraging a switch from QuarkXpress to InDesign, and pushing for the creation of and then leading the editorial board. Then again, we’ll see how long all this lasts.

These are some of the people who put up with me.

The Jurist was also where I made my law school friends. Despite my vocal volume, I’m not really that outgoing, and it usually takes some time for people to get used to me. The forced interactions of the closet that was the newspaper office helped me build some actual relationships. Maybe if I had joined my 1L year, I wouldn’t be so quick to leave NYC. (Then again, maybe I would have gotten some advice about classes and journals, and actually have a job opportunity.)

I'm making love to the camera. So is Rachel's foot.

Like the Thresher before it, the Jurist wrote a very nice parting farewell to alumni. Of course, as a departing alumnus, I was mentioned. The Thresher farewell was a bit tongue-in-cheek, jabbing at my habit of riling up campus and getting into trouble. I understood the lack of some lovely farewell. After all, I’m sure I got on their nerves after four years of the same old routine. It was time to move on. Plus, I was used to critique and displayed a pretty thick skin, so I’m sure they thought it was totally appropriate. Which it was.

But the Thresher was very special to me and, well, I maybe would have wanted something that more honestly recognized my dedication to the paper rather than framing me as some cartoonish troublemaker. Then again, I didn’t do much to dispel that image.

When I started to read the Jurist’s farewell, I expected the same thing. Imagine my pleasant surprise to find a column that spoke without irony or hesitation about my work for the paper.  Graduating in the middle of the class from a second tier law school feels like no grand accomplishment. But this letter, even if for a fleeting moment, made it all worthwhile.

Furthermore, often I have a habit of being goofy, or a joker, or feigning ignorance. To paraphrase what I’ve heard from many people, “Evan’s here for everyone else’s entertainment.” I don’t mind being the jester, and in fact I usually relish the attention. But because of this, people often see me as some buffoonish clown, unserious and dimwitted. So when I read that one descriptive phrase, “Courageous, super-intelligent and undaunted by the consequences of speaking his mind,” well… it was more than I’ve gotten in a very long time and it is a compliment that feels really important.

I really appreciate it.

Anyways, enough of my cliche yet expected self-obsession. Here is the column:

(pdf: jurist farewell mintz)

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